Will the ‘Non-Pribumis’ Please Stand Up?

Wednesday, 25 October 2017 - 10:35:59 WIB
By : Mario Rustan | Category: Politics - 4244 hits
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As we are closing to 2020, we really love to return to the 1980s. Previously I was talking about the retro Pengkhianatan G30S/PKI, and soon after that Jakarta’s Governor Anies Baswedan revived the term pribumi. On his inauguration speech at that.

Many Indonesians understand what he’s getting at. I was aware of the dichotomy of pribumi and non-pribumi as a kid in early 1990s, seeing the terms used in newspapers and television news. My father and my school friends were “non-pri”, non-indigenous Indonesian. But in 1992 and 2017, hardly anyone minded the Arab-Indonesians or Indian-Indonesians or mixed-race Indonesian. “Non-pri” referred exclusively to Chinese-Indonesians.

In the West, ethnic Chinese were the “model minority” – hardworking, law-abiding, and successful. Now many younger Chinese challenge this notion, aware that such idea encouraged passivity in politics, was used to mask systemic discriminations, and hid the complex experiences of being a minority.

On the other hand, in Southeast Asia ethnic Chinese are still not well-accepted. A century ago, Western colonials labeled Southeast Asian Chinese as “Jews of the East” with the similar prejudices against European Jews – disloyal, greedy, and selfish. In 1990s’ Indonesia, “non-pri” carried all the negative tones against Chinese-Indonesians, even when it was supposedly used in neutral context, for example on globalization and inequality. Widely used in conversations in cafes and warung kopi, the term conveniently sanitized racism when talking about what’s holding Indonesia back.

The defenders of Anies' speech followed the textbook steps of justifying racism. First there was denial: His critics supposedly didn’t read the full speech properly. Then, contradict the accusation: “If you think you’re Indonesian, then why do you have to be mad?” Then whataboutism – what about the Chinese slur “tiko”, which is more offensive? Finally, outright racism, praising the governor for saying what the people have felt for years.

The next day, another tactic was used: Anies was not the first and the only politician who used the pribumi word. Within hours, this argument had been debunked – the screenshotted headlines came from a sensationalist tabloid, or had been revised with apology from editors. Such counter-argument did little from deterring people using one of the listed arguments once again. The point is, Anies was right, whether he used pribumi to refer to all Indonesians or to exclude Chinese-Indonesians.

What is absurd is how Chinese-Indonesians were absent from this debate, while in other countries a politicized statement against a minority would invite responses from members of that group. Here I want to express gratitude to my friends who readily called out the governor and troll accounts justifying racism against Chinese-Indonesians.

Why don’t Chinese-Indonesians fight back, then? The most common explanation is that they have been traumatized enough with racial violence, from the war of independence, to the anti-communist massacre of the 1960s, to the May 1998 riots. But I can’t help drawing the comparison with African-Americans, who have faced a century of riots, public lynching, legal discriminations, and, recently, strings of unjustified killing by police officers, and yet still speaking up every day.

 

The defenders of Anies' speech followed the textbook steps of justifying racism. First there was denial… then accusation… then whatoutaboutism …finally, outright racism.



There is a world of difference between African-Americans and Chinese-Indonesians. Around the world, ethnic Chinese are taught by family members and by the community that being political is bad. They are being taught to stay out of trouble, and to mind their own business. I once read a tweet saying that black women keep on fighting because they have nothing to lose, and in my reflection, many ethnic Chinese have so many things to lose, no matter how rich or poor they are.

I believe most Chinese-Indonesians are also alarmed with the invocation of pribumi, and coping with their own ways. I know that there are brave Chinese-Indonesian activists, journalists, analysts, politicians, and academics putting their safety and career on the line to defend pluralism.

I have accepted the fact that I will not able to be close to other Chinese-Indonesians. Just recently I understood that my desire to do so had made me miserable for more than a decade. I am not sure if this is the case with other politically vocal Chinese-Indonesians, but that is what had happened for me.

My friends were mostly silent on the pribumi statement. A friend reported that in her WhatsApp group, several people didn’t understand the meaning of the word when someone brought up the controversy, even when they were in their 30s. When someone else pointed out the context and the implication, there was no discussion developing. What’s going on? Ignorance? Stoicism? Denial? Self-preservation? Currently I’m unable to fathom the ethics of Chinese-Indonesians in dealing with the resurgence of racism here.

Throughout my life I have heard advocation for Chinese-Indonesians to fix their attitudes. To be less rude to other Indonesians. To be more active in the community. To act more “Indonesian”. This politics of respectability, like everywhere in the world, would not fix racism. Professional trolls don’t hate the Chinese because the t-word hurt their loved ones, but because they are bigots working for right-wing politicians.

Political pundits may pinpoint Ahok’s strategic errors in the gubernatorial election, but the real cause he was defeated and convicted is because he’s a Chinese-Indonesian leader, and so many Jakartans, including the middle class and the rich, didn’t want to be governed by a minority. Like in other countries, the racial and religious majority in Indonesia believes that minorities and foreigners are challenging the demographic status quo, and have to be pushed back.

Indonesian bigots will step up their attacks against Chinese-Indonesians, a public enemy along with LGBT+ communities and “communists.” In Indonesia and other countries, it is evident that such blatant hostility could be popular, at least in recent times. I cannot afford waiting for other Chinese-Indonesians to join the resistance. Other Indonesians are willingly standing up for them, for Indonesia, with or without them.

Still, I wish they could care a little bit more. They don’t have to be political, but please give a damn.

Read Mario’s commentary on the heels of the divisive Jakarta gubernatorial election and follow @MarioRustan on Twitter. 

Got an opinion on this issue? Let’s talk about it in the comments section below.

Writer Profile
Mario Rustan, Columnist
Mario  writes opinion pieces for The Jakarta Post and is working on some other online projects and was featured in Guardian Football and SBS Radio. His dream job is still teaching High School History by day and writing for feminism by night. 
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COMMENTS
Prawiro | 25 October 2017 | 14:02:42 WIB
Chinese, unlike Arabs and Indians, rarely mingles with the locals. Since Dutch Collonials times, they received second class citizens (pribumi, third) with many business and social benefits. Arab and Indians who initially came to Nusantara were mostly males and they married local female. That's why they called 'pribumi' as ahwal (the relatives of mother). And Arab descendants has been proven loyal to their 'new' homeland (compared to Chinese). Well, as many Chinese descendants did businesses, they surely needed to lean on the ruler (Dutch). In fact, during the New Order Regime and event today's regime, Chinese descendants keep leaning on the ruler for the sake of their business (status quo). That's why their marvelous skills in trade combined with nepotism with the current rulers make them dominant in Indonesian economy. The.10% of the populations (dominantly chineses off-course) controlled 90% Indonesian economy...
Anon | 26 October 2017 | 10:25:02 WIB
I'm a Chinese-Indonesian and we care, we do care-- a lot, actually. Some of us even willingly to travel back home from distant city or even half-the-globe-away country to vote in presidential election three years ago including me. The majority keep asking us to be more active, to get involved more in the country development, join in and mingle with the 'pribumi’, yet we face daily racism which is getting worse. A Chinese-Indonesian athlete winning a gold medal? They received mockery. Buying grocery in the local market? They raised the price as if we're a free ATM machine. If the country we're born and grew up in doesn't accept us as Indonesian, then why we have to care more? Leave us alone to live quietly and diligently working hard to earn for our family please, because we're tired of this shit.
Marty Drupadi | 26 October 2017 | 13:00:08 WIB
I agree with a lot of things you have said in this article but not with the main message. The onus is not on Chinese-Indonesians to speak up to their oppressors. And it is also not fair to equate not speaking up with not giving a damn. The problem is not them. It is us. We, the oppressors, are morally bound to speak up and highlight the injustices we are inflicting on others, and more importantly, break the systemic barriers that have allowed this to continue decade after decade. For too long, we the Javanese, have tried to shape our country in our own image, forgetting that the country belongs to all Indonesians, not just the Javanese. You are right. Chinese-Indonesians have a lot to lose but there are so many out there that do speak up. Don't diminish their courage. And don't forget that it is us, as part of the majority that have the obligation to speak up for those who are not yet in a position to.
Marty Drupadi | 26 October 2017 | 13:01:27 WIB
I agree with a lot of things you have said in this article but not with the main message. The onus is not on Chinese-Indonesians to speak up to their oppressors. And it is also not fair to equate not speaking up with not giving a damn. The problem is not them. It is us. We, the oppressors, are morally bound to speak up and highlight the injustices we are inflicting on others, and more importantly, break the systemic barriers that have allowed this to continue decade after decade. You are right. Chinese-Indonesians have a lot to lose but there are so many out there that do speak up. Don't diminish their courage. And don't forget that it is us, as part of the majority, that have the biggest moral responsibility to speak up for those who are not yet in a position to.
Stephanie | 26 October 2017 | 23:00:07 WIB
Chindos make their own exclusive little circle, probably traumatized by the 98 event AND daily racism, I don't know. In this circle, Chindos have their own school, their own malls, regencies, etc. While the older generations love to observe and discuss the political situation (and they are aware), their children are rather blind. The older Chindos are the guardians of this circle, where they protect their children and keep them focused with education, malls, and other things but politics (and probably art).

I know, I see it, I'm in it. Ask my sister or one of my friends about the political situation. They'll say 'What?! Such thing is happening?' or 'Yes, they are stupid!' and they will be on fire for a minute then they'll shrug it away. 'Let's eat somewhere,' they'll say, eventually, 'There is a new cafe opening.'
Min | 29 October 2017 | 08:47:35 WIB
I am Chinese Indonesian. Reading these comments.especially from Prawiro is really disheartening. Thank you Marty for your view.
My family came from China in the 50s with only clothes on their back. We worked really hard to assimilate, learn new language and start anew in foreign land. My parents often told us how they only ate 2 meals a day. mostly diluted porridge. As a child I remember walking down the street and heard 2 women said " I can smell the pig out of these Chinese". I was 15. I love Indonesia and see Indonesia as my country and it saddened me to think that we are not seen as Indonesian. is it audacious to hope that one day we are all seen as Indonesian?? . Prawiro. please check the fact. id it posdible for 10% of chinese to own 90% of the wealth? or is this just one of the cleverly created propaganda? I heard of this comment since I was in Primary school. I dare say it is just a well used tool to divide and separate.
Gladys | 30 October 2017 | 20:32:36 WIB
I'm not trying to speak on behalf of all Chinese Indonesians, but as a part of the community, I can tell you that this deeply affects us, and we do care. Not speaking up about it doesn't mean that we don't give a damn. We go through this kind of stuff on a daily basis, and maybe we aren't as fire as the black community, but we STILL care. But the problem here isn't about "if Chinese Indonesian cared enough about the discrimination they are facing", the problem here is whether or not those who are not minorities stropped discriminating us? Because we can be as fire as the black community in facing these oppression, but if we are always silenced and ignored, what's the use of it all?

Check your privilege. That's all I have to say.













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